Teatime poster

We British love a cup of tea! Draw 
and colour your favourites with Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils.
You can go freestyle with the teacup design and then elaborate on the sweet sensations wafting through the air. Try your hand at brush lettering, creating a central sentiment for the poster. Press harder to create a thicker line and write different words within the sentiment in various fonts.

Cinnamon 

Start with a light coloured pencil and work your way up to the darkest. This creates a more even blend and means that you can highlight really easily by building up shadows, instead of trying to lighten up a really dark spot of colour. 

Matcha 

Draw the leaves coming from the tea cup first, these need more colour and definition so make them stand out against the steam. The steam can then be lightly shaded behind the leaves, making sure the steam connects the leaves to the teacup. 

Chocolate 

To create an ombré effect, colour from the bottom up. The bottom is where most shadow would sit on the teacup. 

Wild Berry 

Decide on where your light source is coming from to make your teacup three-dimensional. Add layers and shading to highlight the light source, this will make it appear more life like. 

Chai 

Choose a pastel or light colour to compliment the ingredient that avours your tea. 

Lemon & Ginger 

Have fun with the design of your handle! The quirkier the better, decorate with cool designs to make it truly stand out. 

Peppermint 

Dark details, such as imprinted patterns, need to sit above the shading of the mug. This way they will not get lost when the pattern is the same colour of the mug. 

Earl Grey 

Don’t be afraid to blend contrasting colours to soften a dark tone and to add more interest to a block of colour. 

Popcorn 

Press the pencil down hard for strong, striking colour. This will create an eye catching teacup. 

Chamomile 

Thin black pen can accent the work already done in colour. Online the outline of the teacup, this shows that the pattern is sitting on the mug, as opposed to superimposed onto it. 

Project and how-to instructions by Ashley Stanley-Oakes.

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