Winsor & Newton Gesso Flask

Posted by TheDocraftsTeam, 22 Sep, 2017

Set off on a summer adventure to explore brand new climes – don’t forget your ?ask! A warm cup of tea makes all the difference when you’re taking on the world… Transform an old container with a beautiful ?oral motif, made all the more possible with Winsor & Newton Clear Gesso! This handy product enables you to paint onto virtually any object or surface; put it to the test and see for yourself. Start by applying a layer of Gesso all over the ?ask and lid. It will be completely transparent when dry, so make sure you leave it for a couple of hours before you start painting. Select some Winton Oil Colours to work with: we used Cadmium Orange Hue, Ivory Black, Payne’s Grey, Permanent Geranium Lake, Permanent Crimson Lake, Soft Mixing White, Viridian Hue and Yellow Ochre. Pair the paints with the Sceptre Gold II brushes, in sizes 6, 8 and 10. Follow the steps to start your adventure!

1. Sketch your design to scale on a sheet of paper, starting with the flowers in the middle of the design. Work outwards, incorporating leafy foliage, berries and small flowers.

2. Paint the central flowers on the flask to get the composition in the right place. Start with the lighter shade and add the darker shade in the centre. Finish with black dots in the middle.

3. Working outwards, paint the main body of the leaves first. Use a slightly darker shade of paint to draw very thin lines down the middle of each leaf. 

4. Paint the roses, using a large paintbrush to create a large light pink circle. Add darker strokes with a light sweeping motion, and finish with black dots.

5. To paint the berries, start with the stems and add the berries on top in a contrasting colour. Add shaded areas with a darker colour.

6. Insert lighter foliage by adding a small amount of colour to white paint. Add a little more colour for a darker shade in the middle.

Project and how-to instructions by Fliss French. Project originally published in issue 83 of docrafts Creativity magazine.

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